‘A stupid mule is still smarter than a good horse, or a bad man’

The horse looms large in our popular memory of the Great War. This is perhaps based more on myth than fact; drawing upon romantic symbolism of the horse that goes back long before 1914, and a raft of more general Great War mythology, but the horse's part in the story is represented nonetheless. Yet whilst … Continue reading ‘A stupid mule is still smarter than a good horse, or a bad man’

1917

For months I have seen the film '1917' criticised on Twitter. Almost as soon as the film was announced, people were gathering like a pack of scholarly wolves on the scent of an Alan Clark shaped deer. When the trailer was released the baying began... *howl* the uniforms look incorrect in this 2 millisecond clip … Continue reading 1917

Guest post – James Wearn & Jenny Martin ‘Considering the Great War’s cartography of wounds’

A new paper published in the ‘Aftermath’ special edition of Stand To! The Journal of the Western Front Association offers a comparative perspective on the wounding and healing of soldiers and of the plants which surrounded them on battlefields of the First World War.  A lot of pieces of metal were hurled in reciprocal anger during the Great War.  A … Continue reading Guest post – James Wearn & Jenny Martin ‘Considering the Great War’s cartography of wounds’

‘Whence come I and whither go I? That is the great unfathomable question’

The battlefields of France and Belgium attract many thousands of visitors each year. For most of these people the journeys are one-off pilgrimages, but for others these trips become habitual. The reasons for this vary – some people are just interested in the history, others are driven by a sense of ‘remembrance responsibility’ but there … Continue reading ‘Whence come I and whither go I? That is the great unfathomable question’